Nevada Lemon Law

Lemon vehicles in Nevada can get the squeeze by either the Nevada Lemon Law, the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (the federal lemon law), or both. Lemon-aid may include a refund, replacement or diminished value and/or incidental and consequential damages. Attorneys’ fees are also available meaning qualified consumers may receive Nevada lemon law attorney representation at no cost.

And even if your vehicle is too old or has too many miles to qualify under either of these lemon laws, the Truth In Lending Act and/or other related car buying laws may provide an avenue to recover cash damages that can help you trade out or pay for repairs.

Connect here for a free, no obligation Nevada Lemon Law case review. In most instances to qualify under a lemon law your vehicle must only have an unreasonable repair history under the warranty, including (but not limited to) 3-4 repair attempts for the same problem, 6 repairs total on the vehicle, or 30 days out of service by reason of repair.

Nevada Lemon Law Links

Nevada Lemon Law (N.R.S. 597.600 to N.R.S. 597.688)

Nevada Lemon Law Statutes. N.R.S. 597.600. Definitions

As used in NRS 597.600 to 597.688, inclusive, unless the context otherwise requires:

1. “Buyer” means:

(a) A person who purchases or contracts to purchase, other than for purposes of resale, a motor vehicle normally used for personal, family or household purposes.
(b) Any person to whom the motor vehicle is transferred during the time a manufacturer’s express warranty applicable to the motor vehicle is in effect.
(c) Any other person entitled by the terms of the warranty to enforce its obligations.

2. Except as otherwise provided in this subsection, “motor vehicle” has the meaning ascribed to it in NRS 482.075. The term does not include motor homes or off-road vehicles except for the purposes of NRS 597.680.

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Nevada Lemon Law Rights. N.R.S. 597.610. Report of defect in motor vehicle; duty of manufacturer

If a new motor vehicle does not conform to all of the manufacturer’s applicable express warranties and the buyer reports the nonconformity in writing to the manufacturer:

1. Before the expiration of the manufacturer’s express warranties; or
2. No later than 1 year after the date the motor vehicle is delivered to the original buyer, whichever occurs earlier, the manufacturer, its agent or its authorized dealer shall make such repairs as are necessary to conform the vehicle to the express warranties without regard to whether the repairs will be made after the expiration of the express warranty or the time described in subsection 2.

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Nevada New Car Lemon Law. N.R.S. 597.620. Submission of claim to manufacturer for replacement or refund according to designated procedure

If the manufacturer has established or designated a procedure for settling disputes informally which substantially complies with the provisions of Title 16 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 703, a buyer must first submit his or her claim for replacement of the motor vehicle or for refund of the purchase price under that procedure before bringing any action under NRS 597.630.

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Nevada Automobile Lemon Law. N.R.S. 597.630. Duties of manufacturer if motor vehicle cannot be conformed to express warranties

1. If, after a reasonable number of attempts, the manufacturer, or its agent or authorized dealer is unable to conform the motor vehicle to any applicable express warranty by repair or correction and the defect or condition causing the nonconformity substantially impairs the use and value of the motor vehicle to the buyer and is not the result of abuse, neglect or unauthorized modifications or alterations of the motor vehicle, the manufacturer shall:

(a) Replace the motor vehicle with a comparable motor vehicle of the same model and having the same features as the replaced vehicle, or if such a vehicle cannot be delivered to the buyer within a reasonable time, then a comparable motor vehicle substantially similar to the replaced vehicle; or
(b) Accept return of the motor vehicle from the buyer and refund to him or her the full purchase price including all sales taxes, license fees, registration fees and other similar governmental charges, less a reasonable allowance for his or her use of the vehicle. A reasonable allowance for use is that amount directly attributable to use by the buyer before his or her first report of the nonconformity to the manufacturer, agent or dealer and during any subsequent period when the vehicle is not out of service for repairs. Refunds must be made to the buyer, and lienholder if any, as their interests may appear.

2. It is presumed that a reasonable number of attempts have been undertaken to conform a motor vehicle to the applicable express warranties where:

(a) The same nonconformity has been subject to repair four or more times by the manufacturer, or its agent or authorized dealer within the time the express warranty is in effect or within 1 year following the date the motor vehicle is delivered to the original buyer, whichever occurs earlier, but the nonconformity continues to exist; or
(b) The motor vehicle is out of service for repairs for a cumulative total of 30 or more calendar days within the time the express warranty is in effect or within 1 year following the date the motor vehicle is delivered to the original buyer, whichever occurs earlier, except that if the necessary repairs cannot be made for reasons which are beyond the control of the manufacturer or its agent or authorized dealer, the number of days required to give rise to the presumption must be appropriately extended.

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Nevada Vehicle Lemon Law. N.R.S. 597.640. Tolling of period for express warranties

For the purposes of NRS 597.600 to 597.670, inclusive, the running of the time an express warranty is in effect or of any other period of time described in those sections is tolled for the time during which services to repair the motor vehicle are not reasonably available to the buyer because of a war, invasion or strike, or because of a fire, flood or other natural disaster.

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Nevada Used Car Lemon Law. N.R.S. 597.650. Commencement of action by buyer

Any action brought pursuant to NRS 597.600 to 597.630, inclusive, must be commenced within 18 months after the date of the original delivery of the motor vehicle to the buyer.

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Nevada Lemon Law Statutes. N.R.S. 597.660. Waiver of rights by buyer prohibited

Any provision in any agreement between the manufacturer or its agent or authorized dealer and the buyer which provides that the buyer agrees to waive or forego any rights or remedies afforded by NRS 597.600 to 597.630, inclusive, is void.

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Nevada Lemon Law Rights. N.R.S. 597.670. Effect on other rights and remedies of buyer

The provisions of NRS 597.600 to 597.630, inclusive, do not limit any other right or remedy which the buyer may have by law or by agreement.

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Nevada New Car Lemon Law. N.R.S. 597.675. Notification of manufacturer regarding change in residential address

Any person entitled by the terms of a manufacturer’s express warranty to enforce its obligations is responsible for notifying the manufacturer of any change in his or her residential address.

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Nevada Automobile Lemon Law. N.R.S. 597.680. Reimbursement by manufacturer for cost of repairs to conform vehicle to express warranties

The manufacturer shall reimburse its agent or authorized dealer for the cost of repairs made to a motor vehicle to conform it to the manufacturer’s express warranties. The reimbursement must be paid at the rate usually billed by the agent or dealer to the general public for similar repairs.

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Nevada Vehicle Lemon Law. N.R.S. 597.682. Lemon Law Buyback: General duties regarding retitling, notice and disclosures

1. A manufacturer, or its agent or authorized dealer, who reacquires a motor vehicle pursuant NRS 597.630 that was registered in this State, or any other state, the District of Columbia or any territory or possession of the United States, or who assists a lienholder in reacquiring such a motor vehicle, shall, before selling, leasing or transferring ownership of the motor vehicle in this State or exporting the motor vehicle to another state for sale, lease or transfer:

(a) Cause the motor vehicle to be retitled in the name of the manufacturer;
(b) Request the Department of Motor Vehicles to inscribe the certificate of ownership for the motor vehicle with the notation “Lemon Law Buyback”; and
(c) Affix a decal to the motor vehicle in accordance with subsection 6.

2. Any manufacturer who reacquires, or assists a dealer or lienholder in reacquiring, a motor vehicle in response to a request by the buyer or lessee that the motor vehicle be replaced or accepted for a refund because the motor vehicle did not conform to express warranties shall, before the sale, lease or other transfer of the motor vehicle, execute and deliver to the subsequent transferee a notice and obtain the transferee’s written acknowledgment of the notice in accordance with NRS 597.684.
3. Any person, including any dealer, who acquires a motor vehicle for resale and knows that the motor vehicle was reacquired by the manufacturer of the motor vehicle pursuant to NRS 597.630 shall, before the sale, lease or other transfer, execute and deliver to the subsequent transferee a notice and obtain the transferee’s written acknowledgment of the notice in accordance with NRS 597.684.
4. Any person, including any manufacturer or dealer, who sells, leases or transfers ownership of a motor vehicle when the certificate of ownership for the motor vehicle is inscribed with the notation “Lemon Law Buyback” shall, before the sale, lease, or ownership transfer of the motor vehicle, submit to the transferee a written disclosure signed by the transferee stating that:
THIS VEHICLE WAS REPURCHASED BY ITS MANUFACTURER BECAUSE OF A DEFECT IN THE VEHICLE PURSUANT TO CONSUMER WARRANTY LAWS. THE TITLE TO THIS VEHICLE HAS BEEN PERMANENTLY INSCRIBED WITH THE NOTATION “LEMON LAW BUYBACK.”
5. The requirements for disclosure set forth in subsections 1, 2 and 3 are in addition to any other notice requirements for consumers and do not relieve any person, including any dealer or manufacturer, from complying with any other applicable law.
6. The decal required pursuant to subsection 1 must be affixed to the left front doorframe of the motor vehicle or, if the motor vehicle does not have a left front doorframe, in a location designated by the Department of Motor Vehicles. The decal must specify that the certificate of title to the motor vehicle has been permanently inscribed with the notation “Lemon Law Buyback.” A person shall not knowingly remove or alter any decal affixed to a motor vehicle pursuant to this subsection, regardless of whether the motor vehicle is licensed pursuant to this chapter.

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Nevada Used Car Lemon Law. N.R.S. 597.684. Lemon Law Buyback: Form of notice

1. The notice required pursuant to subsections 1, 2 and 3 of NRS 597.682 must be prepared by the manufacturer of the reacquired motor vehicle and specify:

(a) The year, make, model and vehicle identification number of the motor vehicle.
(b) Whether the certificate of title for the motor vehicle has been inscribed with the notation “Lemon Law Buyback.”
(c) The nature of each nonconformity reported by the original buyer or lessee of the motor vehicle.
(d) The repairs, if any, made to the motor vehicle in an attempt to correct each nonconformity reported by the original buyer or lessee.

2. The notice must be included on a form 8 ½ x 11 inches in size and printed in a size equal to at least 10-point black type on a white background. The form must only contain the following information and be completed by the manufacturer:

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Nevada Lemon Law Statutes. N.R.S. 597.686. Lemon Law Buyback: Prohibition against certain nondisclosure agreements

1. A manufacturer, importer, distributor, dealer or lienholder who reacquires or assists in reacquiring a motor vehicle, whether by judgment, decree, arbitration award, settlement agreement or voluntary agreement, shall not:

(a) Require, as a condition of the reacquisition of the motor vehicle, a buyer or lessee who is a resident of this State to agree to refrain from disclosing the problems with the motor vehicle experienced by the buyer or lessee or the nonfinancial terms of the reacquisition.
(b) Include, in any release or other agreement, whether prepared by the manufacturer, importer, distributor, dealer or lienholder, for signature by the buyer or lessee, a confidentiality clause, gag clause or similar clause prohibiting the buyer or lessee from disclosing information to any other person concerning the problems with the motor vehicle or the nonfinancial terms of the reacquisition of the motor vehicle by the manufacturer, importer, distributor, dealer or lienholder.

2. Any confidentiality clause, gag clause or similar clause included in the release or other agreement in violation of this section is void.
3. The provisions of this section do not prohibit the inclusion within the release or other agreement any confidentiality clause, gag clause or similar clause regarding the financial terms of the reacquisition of the motor vehicle.

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Nevada Lemon Law Rights. N.R.S. 597.688. Lemon Law Buyback: Civil action

A person who incurs an injury or damages as the proximate result of a violation of the provisions of NRS 597.682, 597.684 or 597.686 may commence an action in a court of competent jurisdiction for the recovery of his or her actual damages, costs and reasonable attorney’s fees and for any punitive damages that the facts may warrant.

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6 comments

  1. I have taken my 2012 Camaro to 3 dealers and talked to at least 6 so called highly respected/master mechanics about the transmission problems. The original dealer replaced the transmission in May but it sounds and drives worse. The executive office in Flint Michigan has helped me through this process and agreed with the mechanics there is nothing wrong but then turned around and offered me $3,000 towards a purchase of a new GM vehicle. That doesn’t make any sense. Why can’t someone fix my car and quit giving me the runaround? It’s really a pain in the ass to drive anymore. I have heard several other complaints similar to mine throughout the internet involving the same 2012 Camaro LS1 Coupe, 6 speed manual transmission. Any thoughts on my problem? Two weeks prior I bought a 2003 Chevy Silverado, 5 speed manual transmission, the clutch went out in it. Same dealer and another GM product.

  2. I purchased a 2016 F450 on 7/15/2015 it had 2300 miles on it when it broke down on 9/28/2015 I took it to my dealership (place of employement) on 9/29/2015. The high pressure fuel pump went. I have been with out the vehicle still and counting. I am told that the company that made the pumps is out of business and they don’t know when they can get me one. it will have been in the shop for 60 days on 11/28/15. with no resolution in site.

    I have been emailing back and forth with a Judy Rizzo “Ford Customer Relations” person. Whom at times is responsive and at others is not.

    This past Friday supposedly the whole kit including fuel lines, injector tubes and a pump arrived. The truck was torn down only to find that there was no pump in the kit. it had been removed by Ford.

    No ETA on when I can expect a pump or my truck. I have requested a Buyback from Ford.
    I’ve been driving a $70,000.00 Focus since 9/29/2015. Can you advise?

    • Yes i can advise….if they have had yur truck for more than 30 days,then you can send them a certified or hand delivered leter siteing the states lemon law statute,and a demand that they buy back the truck for the total of what it is worth,plus tax,registration,licensing fees,etc. Also the demand should have the date of your demand,with the dates yur truck has been at the shop,plus yur explanation of the entire sequence of events,then end by saying you expect them to refund you the total within the time frame cited by yur state statute,whether its 10-14-or 30 days.

  3. I BOUGHT A 2002 DODGE CARAVAN FROM SOMEONE OFF THE INTERNET I PUT DOWN 600 DOLLARS AND STILL OWE 800 DOLLARS ON IT BY THE TIME I DROVE IT HOME IT WAS SHAKING REALLY BAD AND THE MOTOR HAS GONE OUT THERE WAS NO WARRANTY BUT I JUST BOUGHT IT THE GUY IS DODGING ME AND ALL I WANT IS MY MONEY BACK WHAT DO I DO.

  4. I PURCHASED MY CAR IN FEBRUARY OF 2017.. WITHIN IN 6 MONTHS MY BRAKES BEGAN TO SQUEAK.. WITHIN ANOTHER 2-3 MONTHS MY OIL SENSOR LIGHT WENT OFF, MY COOLANT STARTED TO LEAK.. I TOOK IT IN FOR AN OIL CHANGE AND COME TO FIND OUT THE PREVIOUS OWNER DUMPED ABOUT 2 BOTTLES OF STOP LEAK IN THE COOLANT TANK WHICH CAUSED BUILD UP OVER TIME.. SO WHEN THE CAR CAME IN MY POSSESSION THE HOSE CONNECTED TO THE COOLANT TANK GAVE OUT AND IS NOW LEAKING CONSISTENTLY. IT NOW HAS GOTTEN TO THE POINT THAT MY CAR SHAKES WHEN ITS PARKED, SHAKES IN REVERSE ON IN DRIVE..

    PLEASE TELL ME WHAT WOULD BE MY NEXT STEPS TO FILE A COMPLAINT UNDER THE LEMON LAW PLEASE… I CAN’T AFFORD THESE REPAIRS AND ITS NOT FAR THAT I NOW HAVE TO PAY FOR ALL THESES ISSUES WHEN I WAS NEVER TOLD ABOUT ANY OF THE ISSUES BEFORE I PURCHASED THE USED CAR..

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